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Ebrahim College

Arabic Intensive Programme

Ebrahim College has developed a unique curriculum for an Arabic Language programme that aims to enable students to be able to read, write, speak and understand Arabic in one year.

Learn the Language of the Qur’an in One Year

The Arabic Intensive is designed for students motivated to learn Arabic in order to gain access to the Qur’an in its language, access to Islamic texts, future academic study or even for personal enrichment.

The programme incorporates intensive modules in Arabic grammar & literature, along with modules dedicated to the language of the Quran & hadith, as well as spoken and written Arabic. In addition to this, three modules of the science of Tajweed are also taught along with the Arabic language course. This is to also contribute to the proficiency of one’s pronunciation and phonetics.

A comprehensive set of modules in jurisprudence (fiqh) covering purification, prayer, fasting, zakah and Hajj are also part of the programme to enrich students further.

The programme is taught in an environment at harmony with the norms of Islamic faith and practice and Arabic is taught as a sacred language.

Students can also expect inspiring lectures delivered by distinguished visiting scholars from around the world.

This programme is a prerequisite for students who are interested in the Alimiyyah Programme and advanced studies in Arabic Language.

The programme can also be studied part time over 2 years.

It is open to both male and female students.

Modes of Study

Option 1 – Full-time (1 year)

Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm

 

Option 2 – Part-time Evenings (2 years)

Tuesday and Thursday, 6pm – 9.30pm

 

Option 3 – Part-time Sundays (2 years)

Sundays, 9am – 6pm

Modules

Arabic Intensive students will be studying the following subjects:

Nahw (Arabic Syntax)

Module title: Nahw

Module code:

Status: Compulsory

Credits:

Taught in: Arabic Intensive

Brief description:

Nahw, together with sarf, is the most important course of the Arabic Intensive as it sets the foundations for understanding the language and engaging further with Arabic texts. The course focuses on ensuring students understand key grammatical concepts and can use them to construct a broad variety of grammatically correct sentences, as well as read the Qur’an and a broad variety of texts. The target is for students to understand 50% of what is read without a dictionary, and this is achieved by reading Arabic texts and applying grammar rules across various subjects. The module is essential for students who want to proceed onto the Alimiyyah programme or continue their Islamic studies elsewhere.

Workload:

This module comprises of daily classes in the first term, with the load being lightened in the remaining terms.

Scope and syllabus:

The course covers basic nahw terminology, objectives and scope of grammar; the classifications of words (kalimah) into nouns (ism), verbs (fiʿl) and particles (ḥarf); the definite and indefinite (al-maʿrifah wa al-nakirah); masculine and feminine (al-mudhakar wa al-mu’annath); singulars, duals and plurals (al-mufrad, al-muthannā wa al-jamʿ); compound structures (al-murakkab): adjectival (tawṣīfī), genitive (iḍāfī) and demonstrative compounds; verbal and nominal sentences (al-jumlah al-ismiyyah wa al-fiʿliyyah); the three cases (i‘rab); inflective and non-inflective nouns.

Suggested reading:

Essential

Ebrahim College Naḥw Course Notes

Additional

Thackston, W. M. An Introduction to Koranic Arabic. Cambridge, Mass: Dept. of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University, 1990.

Haywood, John A., and Hayim Musa Nahmad. A New Arabic Grammar of the Written Language. Lund Humphries. 1990.

Teachers of Ayesha Siddiqua. Lisaan Ul Quran Volumes 1-3. Maktabah al-Bushra.

Alawiye, Imran Hamza. Gateway to Arabic. Anglo-Arabic Graphics.

Khan, Abdus Sattar. Arabic Tutor Parts 1-4. Darul Isha’at. 2000.

Bashir, ‘Aamir. Tasheel al-Nahw version 2.2 based on ʿIlm al-Naḥw by Mawlana Mushtaq Ahmad Charthawali. Ihya Press. 2015. (For the latest PDF version of this book, see https://ilmresources.wordpress.com )

Bashir, ‘Aamir. The Ten Lessons of Arabic based on Das Sabaq of Mawlana ‘Abd al-Salam Kidwai Nadvi. Ihya Press. 2015. (For the latest PDF version of this book, see https://ilmresources.wordpress.com )

Sarf (Morphology)

Module title: Sarf

Module code:

Status: Compulsory

Credits:

Taught in: Arabic Intensive

Brief description:

Sarf, together with nahw, is the most important course of the Arabic Intensive as it sets the foundations for understanding the language and engaging further with Arabic texts. The course focuses on ensuring students understand key morphology concepts and can use them to conjugate verbs and identify word patterns to assist them in writing, as well as reading the Qur’an and a broad variety of texts. The target is for students to understand 50% of what is read without a dictionary, and this is achieved by reading Arabic texts and applying grammar and morphology rules across various subjects. The module is essential for students who want to proceed onto the Alimiyyah programme or continue their Islamic studies elsewhere.

Workload:

This module comprises of daily classes in the first term, with the load being lightened in the remaining terms.

Scope and syllabus:

The course teaches the various conjugations (gender, number, person) for the past tense, (madhi), present-future (mudari‘) and the imperative (amr); the six variations of present/future and conversions from the past tense; prohibition; jussive and subjunctive; simple triliteral verbs; derived triliteral verbs; simple quadrilateral verbs; derived quadraliteral verbs; assimilated verbs; hollow verbs; defective verbs; doubled verbs; complex verbs; hamzated verbs. Students are expected to learn five new verbs per lesson.

Suggested reading:

Essential

Ebrahim College Notes on Sarf
Verb booklet

Additional

Muhammad, Ebrahim. From the Treasures of Arabic Morphology. Zam Zam Publishers: Karachi. 2005.
Teachers of Ayesha Siddiqua. Lisaan Ul Quran Volumes 1-3. Maktabah al-Bushra.
Patni, Abu Bakr. The Cream of Arabic Imperative Words – With Modern Words – English rendering of Safwat al-Masadir by Maulana Ahmed Charthaawli. Zam Zam Publishers: Karachi. 2013

Audio and video resources

Pimsleur.com (audible.co.uk)
Arabic podcast: www.arabicpod.net
Al Jazeera children www.jcctv.net
www.nicetranslator.com
www.brainscape.com
www.quizlet.com Youtube (Lessons on Sarf)

Apps

Arabic fun easy learn
Ankidroid Flashcards

Arabic Literature & Creative Writing

Module title: Arabic Literature & Creative Writing

Module code:

Status: Compulsory

Credits:

Taught in: Arabic Intensive

Brief description:

This course will develop students’ reading and writing skills, as well as ingraining an appreciation of Arabic literature through a selection of classical and modern Arabic readings.

Workload:

This module is taught over 24 weeks with 5 periods of contact a week.

Scope and syllabus:

The Arabic Literature is a combination of classical and modern Arabic. Modern Arabic is based on A-Level Arabic and Islamic studies materials, whereas classical Arabic is taught through texts such as Nadwi’s Qasas al-nabiyin and al-Qira’at al-rashida and al-Manfaluti’s Majdulin.

Reading:

al-Nadwi, Abu al-Hasan. Qisas al-Nabiyyīn. Multiple editions.
al-Nadwi, Abu al-Hasan. al-Qirāʼat al-Rāshidah. Multiple editions.
Kaylani, Kamil. Abd Allah al-Barrī wa Abd Allah al-Baḥrī. Multiple editions.
al-Manfalūti, Mustafà Lutfi. Mājdūlīn. Multiple editions.
Ibn al-Muqaffaʿ. Kalilah wa Dimnah. Multiple editions.

Language of the Qur'an

Module title: Language of the Qur’an

Module code:

Status: Compulsory

Credits:

Taught in: Arabic Intensive

Brief description:

As well as being one of the application modules in the Arabic Intensive, the Language of the Quran is one of the most important modules of the course. It introduces students to the study of the Qur’anic text and exposes them to Qur’anic vocabulary, commentary, themes, background, and structure, providing them insight into the devotional element of selected surahs. The module should help students understand up to 50% of the Qur’anic text without need of a dictionary.

Workload:

This module is taught over 24 weeks, during terms 2 and 3, with 3 contact periods a week.

Scope and syllabus:

The course consists of linguistic analysis and basic commentary of Yasin, al-Waqi‘ah, al-Mulk, al-Sajda, al-Kafirun, al-Ikhlas, al-Falaq and al-Nas as well as other selected verse of the Qur’an.

Reading:

Essential

Abdel Haleem, M. A. The Qurʼan: A New Translation. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011.

Additional

Ṣābūnī, Muḥammad ʻAlī. Ṣafwat al-tafāsīr. Multiple editions.
Muḥammad Shafīʻ, and Muḥammad Taqī ʻUs̲mānī.
Maʻariful-Quran. Karachi: Maktaba-e-Darul-Uloom, 1996.
Ali, Muhammad Mohar. A word for word meaning of the Qur’ân: with explanatory notes, word meanings with cross references and grammatical hints. Ipswich, Suffiolk: Jamʻiat ʼIḥyaaʼ ‘Minhaaj Al-Sunnah, 2003.

Language of the Sunnah

Module title: Language of the Sunnah

Module code:

Status: Compulsory

Credits:

Taught in: Arabic Intensive

Brief description:

This module has been designed to introduce Arabic Intensive students to the genre of prophetic traditions. Using small hadith compilations such as Zād al-Ṭālibīn and basic Arabic commentaries, students will apply the nahw and sarf theory learnt in the first term to their reading of Arabic texts, and analysing selected traditions both linguistically and grammatically.

Workload:

This module is taught over 24 weeks, during terms 2 and 3, with 3 periods contact a week.

Scope and syllabus:

The course will focus on linguistic and grammatical analysis, as well as a basic commentary, of selected traditions. Students will also be expected to memorise forty hadiths

Suggested reading:

ʻĀshiq Ilāhī, Muḥammad, Provisions for the Seekers: A Manual of Prophetic Ḥadīths with Commentary (Zād al-Ṭālibīn). Translated by Abdur-Rahman Ibn Yusuf. Santa Barbara, Calif: White Thread Press, 2005.

Spoken Arabic

Module title: Spoken Arabic

Module code:

Status: Compulsory

Credits:

Taught in: Arabic Intensive

Brief description:

The core objective of this module is to develop communication skills, and to give students the confidence to have basic discussions in Arabic in some of the other modules during terms 2 and 3.

Workload:

This module is taught over 36 weeks with 1 period contact a week.

Scope and syllabus:

The course will loosely follow the GCSE Arabic Specification in accordance with Edexcel. The following five broad themes will be explored over the course of the year: 1. Identity and culture: Who am I?; daily life; cultural life. 2. Local area, holiday & travel: holidays; travel and tourist transactions; town, region and country. 3. School: what school is like. 4. Future aspirations, study and work: employment, ambitions, work 5. International and global dimension: bringing the world together, environmental issues

Suggested reading:

Aal Shaikh, Mohammed Ibn Abdul Rahman. Al-ʿArabiyyah bayna yadayk. Al-ʿArabiyyah Li al-Jamīʿ: Riyadh. 2008.

Tajweed

Module title: Tajweed

Module code:

Status: Compulsory

Credits:

Taught in: Arabic Intensive

Brief description:

This course develops students’ Qur’an recitation according to the rules of recitation of Imam Hafs from Imam ‘Asim. While primarily practical, theory is also covered to

Workload:

This module is taught over 36 weeks with 4 contact periods a week.

Scope and syllabus:

The first two terms focus on practical implementation and memorisation of rules using simple terms, although some elements of advanced theory may occasionally be introduced. Students will also be expected to learn how to recite some of the shorter surahs to a high standard. The third term focuses on study of the the pronunciation of letter and revisiting some of the theory at a more advanced level, as well as revising the memorised surahs and reading from the mushaf following the rules of recitation.

Reading:

Compulsory

Rules of Tajwid. Safar Publications.

Supplementary

Ebrahim College Tajweed Notes
Abū ʿAmr al-Dānī. Al-Taḥdīd fī al-Itqan wa al-Tajwīd. Multiple editions.

Fiqh of Prayer*

Module title: Fiqh of Prayer

Module code:

Status: Compulsory

Credits:

Taught in: Arabic Intensive

Brief description:

This is an introductory course on the fiqh and inner dimensions of purification (tahara) and prayer (salat). It provides practical knowledge that relates to one’s obligatory worship as well as being a core module of the Arabic Intensive that provides the prerequisite foundations for further study of the subject in Arabic during the Arabic Intensive course.

Workload:

This module is taught over 36 weeks with 1 period contact a week during term 1, and 2 periods contact a week during terms 2 and 3.

Scope and syllabus:

This course covers impurities (najāsah); ablutions (wuḍū’) and its inner dimensions; bathing (ghusl); preparation for prayer; conditions and prerequisites of ṣalāh; inner dimensions of prayer; different types of ṣalāh; supplicating and remembrance after prayer.

Suggested reading:

Essential

Ebrahim College Notes on Ṭahārah and Ṣalāh

Additional

Rabbani, Faraz. Absolute Essentials of Islam: Faith, Prayer, & the Path of Salvation According to the Hanafī School. London: White Thread Press, 2008.
Muḥammad S̲anāʼullāh Pānīpatī. Essential Islamic knowledge (Mā Lā Budda Minhū). Translated by Yusuf Talal De Lorenzo. Leicester: UK Islamic Academy, 2003.
Shurunbulālī, al-Ḥasan. Ascent to Felicity: a Manual on Islamic Creed and Ḥanafī Jurisprudence (Maraqi ‘l-Saʻadat). Translated by Faraz Khan. London: White Thread Press, 2010.
Shurunbulālī, Ḥasan. Nur al-Idah: The Light of Clarification. Translated by Wesam Charkawi. Lagare Publishers. 2010.
Abū al-Husayn, Aḥmad Ibn Muḥammad. The Mukhtaṣar al-Qudūrī (A manual of Islamic Law according to the Hanafi School). Translated by Ṭāhir Maḥmūd Kiānī. Ta-Ha Publishers. 2010.
Nadwi, Akram. Al-Fiqh al-Islāmī. Angelwing Media. 2007.

Sīrah*

Module title: Sīrah – The Life of the Prophet Muḥammad ﷺ

Module code:

Status: Compulsory

Credits:

Taught in: Arabic Intensive

Brief description:

This course provides insight into key events of the life of the Prophet Muḥammad ﷺ and some of his unique characteristics using Ibn Sayyid al-Nās’ famous biography of the Prophet entitled Nūr al-ʿUyūn fī Talkhīṣ sīrah al-Amīn al-Ma’mūn .

Workload:

This module is taught over two terms (24 weeks) with 2 contact periods a week.

Scope and syllabus:

The course covers the lineage of the Prophet Muḥammad , his birth and early life, prophethood & revelation, pilgrimages and battles, as well as his attributes, names and mannerisms, family, home life, and his passing away.

Reading:

Essential

Ibn Sayyid al-Nas, Abdul-Fath Muhammad ibn Muhammad. Nūr al-ʿUyūn fī Talkhīṣ sīrah al-Amīn al-Ma’mūn. Dar al-Minhaj: Jeddah. 2013.

Additional

Ibn Sayyid al-Nas, Abdul-Fath Muhammad ibn Muhammad. The Light of the Eyes – A Concise Biography of the Trustworthy and Reliable Prophet. Turath Publishing. 2016.
Lings, Martin. Muhammad: His Life Based on the Earliest Sources. Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society, 2007.
Al-Mubarakpuri, S. R. The Sealed Nectar. Lahore: Darussalam, 2003.
Ibn Isḥāq, Muḥammad. The life of Muhammad: a translation of Isḥāq’s Sīrat rasūl Allāh. Translated by Alfred Guillaume. Karachi: Oxford University Press, 2013.

Introductory Muslim Theology*

Module title: Introductory Muslim Theology

Module code:

Status:

Credits:

Taught in: Arabic Intensive

Brief description:

This course introduces the basic tenets of normative Muslim creed.

Duration:

This module is taught over 36 weeks with 2 periods contact a week.

Content Summary:

This course introduces theology and its history. Key concepts such as Islam and iman are explained. This is followed by a study of the pillars of faith (Allah, the angels, the prophets, the books, the hereafter and destiny).

Suggested Reading:

– al-Tahawi, Abu Ja‘far, I‘tiqadahl al-sunna wa ’l-jama‘a.
– Yusuf, Hamza, The Creed of Imam al-Tahawi, California: Zaytuna Institute, 2007
– Mangera, Abdur Rahman, Imam Abu Hanifa’s al-Fiqh al-Akbar Explained, California: White Thread Press, 2007
– Amjad M Hussain, The Muslim Creed: A Contemporary Theological Study, Cambridge: The Islamic Text Society, 2016

*These are non-core modules and are only taught in the full-time programme.

Modes of Study

Option 1 – Full-time (1 year)

Monday – Friday, 9am – 5pm

 

Option 2 – Part-time Evenings (2 years)

Tuesday and Thursday, 6pm – 9.30pm

 

Option 3 – Part-time Sunday (2 years)

Sundays, 9am – 6pm

Progression

progression

2 Years Part-Time

 

Modes of Study

 

Option 1 – Sunday

9am till 6pm

  • Core modules: Arabic Syntax, Morphology, Arabic Literature, Language of Quran and Sunnah, Fiqh of Worship (in Arabic)
  • Optional modules: Spoken Arabic and Tajweed
  • FREE access to part time modular courses (excluding Arabic Language and year long programmes)

 

Option 2 – Tuesday and Thursday

6pm – 9.30pm.

  • Core modules: Arabic Syntax, Morphology, Arabic Literature, Language of Quran and Sunnah, Fiqh of Worship (in Arabic)
  • FREE access to part time modular courses (excluding Arabic Language and year long programmes)

Year 1

Introduction to Arabic

Arabic Syntax

Arabic Morphology

Year 2

Arabic Literature

Language of the Qur’an and Sunnah

Fiqh of Worship (in Arabic)

Life at Ebrahim College

Ebrahim College is an institute of learning that is dedicated to Islamic Studies and providing a comprehensive service to the community. Thus a student that enrols here benefits from access to the many services and activities that exist at such an institution. Some are mentioned below:

 

Pastoral Tutorials:

Along with providing you with the best possible classroom experience, your personal and spiritual development is also important to us so that every student becomes and remains a person of integrity, piety and responsibility. A specific weekly tutorial with a tutor provides a platform for regular naseeha (counsel) and the opportunity to discuss any issues that students may have with their studies or their lives in general. Furthermore, the tutor remains the first contact for a student’s pastoral needs.

 

Constant Company of Scholars:

Every student at EC remains immersed in an environment where traditionally trained scholars of different specialities and interests are always around. They teach various subjects, run study circles and organise and encourage extracurricular activities that students will be able to benefit from. Lifelong connections are formed and many of our students maintain a close relationship with their teachers, as per tradition, even after they have completed their studies.

In addition, some of the best scholars in the world and dignitaries from the Islamic World are regular visitors to EC. While people in the community have limited access to these luminaries, EC students are privileged with spending time with them and benefiting from them.

 

Leadership and Community Development:

Your teachers are more than just teachers; they are community leaders in their own right and are pivotal to their communities. You are also an integral part of your community as well as a torchbearer of knowledge. EC is dedicated to developing leaders of the future and inspiring dedication to the community in every student. If you have such aspirations, EC is just the right place where you will find the relevant academic, spiritual as well as vocational nourishment.

This is specifically catered for by encouraging students to participate in extracurricular activities and volunteering. Our weekly open-to-the-public study circle called ‘Seekers’ Station’ is organised by the students. Many students are given the opportunity to get involved in our children’s supplementary schools as teaching assistants, and given support to setup community initiatives in their localities. In addition there are opportunities to get involved in mentoring, fundraising, trips to umrah and retreats, events organising, da’wah and community activism.

 

Facilities

EC’s facilities are dedicated and tailored to its students with private areas for women, dedicated study spaces, a library and prayer area, and constant access to the facilities and study spaces throughout the day.

General Policy (please read this first)

Ebrahim College is a registered charity and as part of its vision and mission, it endeavours to provide its courses and services at an affordable price or where possible for free. The College does not seek to make a profit but to cover the costs incurred in delivering its courses and services, and in sustaining quality and growth.

Many of the courses are subsidised by the College through the support of generous donors.

EC is committed to supporting students who are dedicated to our programmes but, for genuine extenuating circumstances, cannot afford to pay the full cost. Such students can apply for financial support from our Mus’ab ibn Umair Fund.

The actual cost of our full time programmes is higher than the £2,500.00 per year we charge.

Financial support

If you are committed to joining the Arabic Intensive, Alimiyyah, or Dawrah al-Hadith programmes, but cannot afford to pay the full fees, do not worry. It may be possible for you to receive financial assistance from the Mus’ab ibn Umair Fund. Applicants are required to fill in the Financial Support Form in addition to the standard application form for admission. Click here to learn more and apply.

Course Fee for the Arabic Intensive Programme

Full time: £2,500.00 per year
Part time: £1,250.00 per year

Frequently Asked Questions

Programme Information

Click on the question to see the answer.

This is an intensive Arabic language programme that deals with the learning of the language from a variety of facets. It will start you from the very basics of the Arabic language and by the end, one will be able to read, write and understand Arabic with a considerable ability in speaking Arabic despite not being in an Arab country. If you have the dedication and enthusiasm, and put the time and effort, this seemingly difficult dream transpires gradually into reality throughout the course of just one year in the full time programme while it takes two years in the part time programme. You will study intensive modules in Arabic grammar and literature, along with modules dedicated to the language of the Quran and hadith, and spoken and written Arabic. In addition to this, three modules of the science of Tajweed are also taught along with the Arabic language course. This is to also contribute to the proficiency of one’s pronunciation and phonetics.


  • Applicants must be 16 or over.
  • It is essential that students have a basic foundation in reciting the Qur’an.
  • Applicants must have achieved or be predicted 5 A-Cs in GCSEs including English.
  • International applicants must have achieved the equivalent qualifications in their respective country.
  • The course is also perfect for anyone who intends to take a gap year from studies or a career break. As a basic minimum, students must be passionate and enthusiastic about studying the Arabic language and most importantly it should be remembered that it is designed to be intensive so you should be wary of the fact that it will take up a lot of your time and will require serious dedication.

Anyone that successfully completes the Arabic Intensive course gets the blessed opportunity to study in the Alimiyyah programme. The Alimiyyah programme is an opportunity to delve deeper into the different Islamic sciences. These subjects include Tafsir, Fiqh, Hadith, Ulumul Hadith, Usulul Fiqh, History etc. The Arabic language is a tool that allows the student to venture into the treasures of the Islamic Sciences that are in Arabic.

Alternatively, a student may delve into different matters associated with the Arabic medium from further studies to travelling abroad to study.


All classes are fully segregated with separate entrances for brothers and sisters. For Tajweed, brothers and sisters have separate classes.


Though the Arabic language is the focus, we also wanted to cater for the essential knowledge that all are required to know. Hence, a comprehensive set of modules covering Aqeedah and the Fiqh of Purification and Prayer are also part of the programme. However, these cover the foundations. Each of these subjects and more get covered in greater depth and profundity when one proceeds onto the Alimiyyah programme.


Full time:

Timings for the full time course will be between 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday. Everyone is required to commit to the timing between 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday. This is a 1 year programme.

The course is from September until July.

Part time:

We offer two part time study modes:

Option 1 – Sundays 9am till 6pm

Option 2 – Tuesday and Thursday from 6pm – 9.30pm

These classes cover the bulk of the Arabic subjects. Other classes will be offered on the part time modular courses to enable greater flexibility for students as they can choose a class schedule according to their availability and other commitments.

This is a 2 year programme.


There is sufficient homework that is allocated for the course. The course time includes sessions which are dedicated as study sessions where one gets the opportunity to do the homework as well as having a teacher present to offer assistance if any require it. These study sessions provide opportunities to minimise the amount of work taken home. The amount of homework time required will differ according to different people. However, one may be expected to do an average of 2 hours of homework a day for the full time and roughly half of that amount for the part time.


Yes. All of the course material will be provided. Over the years, we have developed our own material as well as materials that are already in the market. There are many popular resources in the market, but we felt that none of them seem to meet the needs and specifications required to truly contribute to a progressive mode of study. Hence, we have endeavoured over the years to produce materials suited to what we believe is pertinent to a student’s need in regards the Arabic language.


Over the years, our team of scholars have developed a new syllabus for this course from various books creating a hybrid variation of the different resources out on the market. We do not feel any one book “ticks all the boxes”. Our course is much more diverse and engaging than going through a book cover to cover. The teaching is very interactive which contributes to a very interesting and interactive learning experience.


Our 2020/21 course will run online only and both online and onsite from the year after. We will confirm and update details once confirmed.


The courses run from September until July.


Holidays are very much integrated within the academic year. Holidays will be scheduled in around normal school term holidays. However, some holidays will be slightly tweaked to accommodate certain Islamic holidays such as Eid holidays.

Fees



Any financial assistance granted will be subject to status. Only full scholarships that are granted based on merit and aptitude are an exception. This means that awards will be means tested and applicants will be expected to pay and self-finance what they can and prove that they cannot afford the remainder. This makes it fair for everyone and ensures that no one is refused admission on the basis of lack of affordability and the neediest students receive the support.
As a charity that exists only to serve the community, our aim is simple, people who are able to pay should pay, people who cannot should not be turned away because of it.


Applicants are required to fill in the Financial Support Form along with the course application form.

If your application is shortlisted, you will be contacted to arrange a suitable time for an interview. You will be contacted within 10 working days of your application.
Following the interview, applicants will be notified of a decision by the end of July. In most cases, applicants will be notified a lot earlier.


Yes, it is possible to pay in instalments. Applicants will be required to pay the deposit to secure their placement. The remaining balance can be paid in 7 monthly instalments starting from September to March.


No, there is no admission fee. You are only required to pay your course fees.


In normal circumstances, loans are not afforded to anyone. However, those in dire extenuating circumstances may be provided with an interest free loan. Our advice is you should apply if you think you cannot afford it and talk to us about your fees and affordability in the interview if you have any issues.


At present, we do not provide grants for any of our courses. Grants have been very difficult to come by but we are continuously pursuing any avenues to secure grants that our students may be eligible for.


Travel & Accommodation


There are no parking facilities in and around the institute during the day. Parking is free after 17:30. Parking in the immediate vicinity of the College is quite expensive. However, there are places somewhat local where parking is cheaper. If one can only drive to the College and must bring their car, then provisions may be possible to arrange. This can be discussed during the interview process.


The stations in proximity to the College are Whitechapel, Aldgate East and Shadwell.


One may apply for the discounted student oyster card but terms and conditions apply.


Ebrahim College does not currently have any accommodation on site for students. The College has plans to develop its own student accommodation near the College so that students from all over the world are able to come and study here.



Miscellaneous


All interviews are conducted at the College on a face-to-face basis. A telephone interview will be held with international applicants.


You can submit your application any time throughout the year.


Application deadline: Applications can still be submitted after this date (but will be classified as “late”) and we cannot guarantee that places will still be available. We always recommend applying as early as possible – the later in the year that an application is submitted the fewer places are likely to be available.


We operate a waiting list system. Due to the intensity of the programme, it is very difficult to make up for missed lessons. As such we will not be filling drop out positions after the first term. However, we may consider anyone that can proficiently demonstrate the knowledge and skill level of the content that is covered up to that time.



If anyone has some back ground in the Arabic language, then it would be a good idea to allow yourself to be assessed so that your level and depth of the Arabic language can be determined. If based on the interview and assessment one is sufficiently able to read and understand some of the texts that will be taught in the Alimiyyah programme then, in that case, there is no need to enrol into the Arabic Intensive programme, and one may simply just enrol onto the Alimiyyah programme.


It would not be possible to study specific subjects only. Students would have to commit to the entire programme.


Students are permitted to transfer from full time to part time at the discretion of the programme manager, subject to the availability of seats and contents covered.


There is no particular dress code that one must adhere to. However, students are strongly advised to dress smart, and to dress in clothing that is in line with the Islamic dress code. Clothing must be of a modest and conservative nature.


We warmly welcome students from all over the United Kingdom, and beyond. Foreign students would be required to arrange their visas (if necessary) and accommodation separately. We would assist where possible.


The college currently does not provide lunch. Students will have sufficient breaks where they can enjoy the Halal Restaurants and supermarkets this highly Muslim populated area has to offer.


Prayer is observed at the college. We have adequate ablution facilities. We try our best to pray during break times. Where it is not possible, classes will break for prayer and students will return to class immediately after. Jumu’ah is prayed at the college as well.


Our 2020/21 course will run online only and both online and onsite from the year after. We will confirm and update details once confirmed.

 

If your query is not answered in the FAQs, please contact us.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course all students will be able to:

  • Read general text and understand 50% without a dictionary and most of it with a dictionary.
  • Read Qur’anic text and understand 50% of its literal import without a dictionary, and most of it with a dictionary.
  • Workout un-vowelled text using ‘I’rab (grammatical analysis) and read the text with 60% accuracy.
  • Able to follow the gist of a general dialogue in spoken fusha Arabic.
  • Able to compose short essays on general topics.

 

In addition to the above, most students will be able to:

  • Read general and Qur’anic text and understand 70% without a dictionary and all of it with a Qur’anic dictionary.
  • Workout un-vowelled text using ‘I’rab (grammatical analysis) and read the text with 80% accuracy.
  • Able to follow general dialogue in spoken fusha Arabic and contribute to it.
  • Able to compose longer essays with more sophisticated use of language and grammar on general topics.

 

In addition to the above, some students will be able to:

  • Workout un-vowelled text using ‘I’rab (grammatical analysis) and read the text with above 90% accuracy.
  • Able to follow general dialogue in spoken fusha Arabic and actively engage in it.

Testimonials

I began the Arabic Intensive, less than two months ago. I had high expectations from the course and Alhamdulillah, I have not been disappointed. My motivation for studying Arabic began when I was in Makkah in 2018. I was at a turning point in my life and realised that although I had a job, I was educated and I was independent, my knowledge of the deen was lacking.

Initially, I was impressed by the positivity and sense of community between the students, new and existing. In our class, we have a range of experiences and backgrounds and I am pleased to be part of a community where we study and grow together.

All of our teachers are experienced, knowledgeable and supportive to all students. They are inspirational people who do not just teach us the skills we need to read, write and understand Arabic, but also include valuable pearls of wisdom for our spiritual development. Our weekly tutorials provide essential nourishment to our souls and teach us the attributes of one seeking knowledge.

Being a primary school teacher, I have been educated in a very different environment. When I applied for this course, I was challenging myself. I was a total beginner to Arabic grammar, and had no experience of speaking and writing Arabic. However, I am astonished by the progress we have made in such a short span of time. For this, I am extremely grateful to Allah, the teachers, and the support of my fellow students.

Zainab AIFT, 2019-2020

 

So far my highlight has been all the Arabic vocabulary I have learnt and how I put it into practice. I find the teachers very helpful and I appreciate the support and the respect they give towards students. Coming from a background of not much Arabic, I have adapted well and this environment really helps boost your confidence for Arabic. I feel like it has made me become stronger and I have started to read Qur’an more daily and have adapted it to my daily life. Mufti Khalid told us the importance of dua and how we should make it and I use this information daily to talk to Allah as it helps me to feel closer.

My favourite subject has just begun and it is Adab it is my favourite subject because I love learning the aspects of it. I would definitely recommend it (Arabic Intensive programme), when I first signed up I didn’t know what to expect and if my decision was the right one but spending time here has made me realise that this was the best choice I could ever make.

Naveirah, AIFT 2019-2020

 

Ebrahim College has been more than I had expected, alhamdulillah. The teaching is engaging because students are able to see the passion of the teachers who encourage and push us to do better.

After three months of being on the Arabic Intensive course, I am able to translate sentences and my vocabulary has increased. My relationship with Allah and the Qur’an has changed since starting my studies at EC, I feel closer to Allah with all the constant reminders while spending time in Ebrahim college with both sisters and teachers.

I would definitely recommend Ebrahim College to people who want to study the Arabic language while still benefiting from the islamic environment.

Faiza, AIFT 2019-2020

 

I am a student on the Arabic Intensive and have been studying at Ebrahim College for a few months now. I can gladly say that I have improved greatly in such a short time. I did not expect to progress so quickly and thanks to the skilled teachers I am able to.

Although studying at Ebrahim college is a great experience, the sense of community is another reason I really enjoy studying at the college. Studying a new language can be daunting but with great help from the competent teachers and supportive classmates I am able to confidently use my knowledge. The teachers play a big role in our progress and with their skills, I have learnt so much and become confident in contributing in class.

The knowledgeable teachers make a point to provide their students with beneficial reminders, inspiring stories and advice that I believe has kept me motivated and driven.

Alhamdulillah, studying at Ebrahim College has been very beneficial and I cannot wait to study even further Inshaa’Allah.

Sanaa AIFT, 2019-2020

Application and Interview Process

  • Applications are open all year round.
  • If your application is shortlisted, you will be contacted to arrange a suitable time for an interview. You will be contacted within 10 working days of your application.
  • Following the interview, applicants will be notified of a decision. 

The course will start in September. Enrolments have started and places do fill up very quickly, so apply now!

Ready to apply?

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